Career Opportunities in Radio Spectrum Innovation at Olin College of Engineering

On TJ. Nicholas Lanemanuesday, December 6, at noon, SpectrumX Center Director Nick Laneman will give a presentation at the Olin College of Engineering Norden Auditorium entitled “Career Opportunities in Radio Spectrum Innovation.”

Students are invited to attend and learn about what they may pursue next in the radio spectrum field, and how they may become involved with SpectrumX, an NSF Spectrum Innovation Center.

Norden Auditorium is located on the first floor of Milas Hall.

Abstract: Many industries are expanding their use of wireless technologies, with futuristic applications, ever more connected people and things, utilizing wider bandwidths and higher frequencies, and putting tremendous pressure on access to radio spectrum. Because the radio spectrum is regulated by government organizations at the national and international levels, developing technology and policy innovations to benefit society requires collaboration and interdisciplinary work among business and government leaders, engineers and scientists, economists, lawyers, regulators, and policymakers.

In this talk, we will view radio spectrum innovation as a field of its own and motivate career development in this field. First, we will characterize the vibrant spectrum ecosystem in the United States, which includes numerous companies and industry associations, most federal agencies, key national and international regulators, and leading centers and institutes in academia. Second, we will highlight some of the pressing challenges being faced by this ecosystem, in particular issues like fully enabling 5G and beyond, imposing receiver standards, combining terrestrial and satellite networks, and spectrum sharing. Finally, we will overview SpectrumX – an NSF Spectrum Innovation Center, as the world’s largest academic hub within the spectrum ecosystem for advancing interdisciplinary research, education and workforce development, collaboration, and policy outreach.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Nick Laneman is Director of SpectrumX – An NSF Spectrum Innovation Center, Founding Director and currently Co-Director of the Wireless Institute in the College of Engineering, and Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. He joined the faculty in August 2002 shortly after earning a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His research and teaching interests are in wireless system design, radio spectrum access, technology standards and intellectual property, and regulatory policy. Laneman is an IEEE Fellow, has received the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award, the Presidential Early-Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), and the NSF CAREER Award, and has been recognized twice by Thomson Reuters as an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. He is author or co-author on over 145 publications and is co-inventor on 8 U.S. patents.

October SpectrumX Center Meeting a Success

The SpectrumX Center Meeting on October 3 and 4, held at the University of Virginia (UVA), brought together over 65 learners and leaders for cross-cutting discussions on timely and interdisciplinary topics.

“The meeting provided an opportunity for students, researchers, stakeholders, and professionals in policy making to come together at UVA to discuss some of the most important subjects in our field,” said Bobby Weikle, SpectrumX Steering Committee Chair and Radio and Network Technologies Research Lead, and Professor at the University of Virginia. “UVA has a long history of collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and it was a great opportunity to bring their teams and our center together in-person and online.”

Twenty years of research and collaboration, culminating in SpectrumX, featured in keynote address at GRCon 22

On Thursday, September 30, SpectrumX Center Director Nick Laneman gave a keynote address at GRCon 22 in Washington D.C. Laneman concurrently co-directs the Wireless Institute in the College of Engineering and is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame.

GNU Radio is “a free and open-source software development toolkit that provides signal processing blocks to implement software radios,” according to its website. It is utilized by researchers, industry, government, hobbyist, and academic stakeholders alike.

Stephanie Adams

Dr. Stephanie G. Adams is the 5th Dean of the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Texas, Dallas. Previously Dr. Adams served as the Dean of the Frank Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University (2016–2019), Department Head and Professor of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech (2011–2016) and held faculty and administrative positions at Virginia Commonwealth University (2008–2011) and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1998–2008).

Her research interests include: Broadening Participation, Faculty and Graduate Student Development, International/Global Education, Teamwork and Team Effectiveness, and Quality Control and Management.  In 2003, she received the CAREER award from the Engineering Education and Centers Division of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Adams is a leader in the advancement and inclusion of all in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.  She has worked with a number of colleges and universities, government agencies and non-profit organizations on topics related to graduate education, mentoring, faculty development and diversifying STEM. A few examples include: The University of Michigan, North Carolina State University, NASA Must Program, QEM Network and the Gates Millennium Scholars Program.

Dr. Adams is a leader in the advancement and inclusion of all in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.  She has had the privilege of serving on the Board of Directors for a number of STEM organizations including the American Society of Engineering Education, the National Society of Black Engineers, Women in Engineering ProActive Network, and the National GEM Consortium. She has also worked with the National Academy of Engineering, the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Institute of Industrial Engineers, the Quality Education for Minorities Network, and the Council of Graduate Schools to build supportive educational coalitions and partnerships in advancing the engineering profession and educational community.

Dr. Adams is the recipient of numerous awards, including: the 2017 WEPAN Founder’s Award; the 2016 ASEE Engineering Management Division Bernard R. Sarchet Award; the 2013 North Carolina A&T State University Distinguished Alumni Award; the 2008 DuPont Minorities in Engineering Award from the American Society of Engineering Education; the Holling Teaching/Advising/Mentoring Award, the Henry Y. Kleinkauf Outstanding Assistant Professor Teaching Award, the Assistant Professor Service Award and the Chancellor’s Fulfilling the Dream Award from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; and the Janice A. Lumpkin Educator of the Year from the National Society of Black Engineers.  In 2005, she was selected as an AAAS/NSF Science and Engineering Policy Fellow and in 2006 she was an Invited Participant for the U.S. Frontiers in Engineering Symposium hosted by the National Academy of Engineering.

Dr. Adams is an honor graduate of North Carolina A&T State University, where she earned her BS in Mechanical Engineering, in 1988. In 1991, she was awarded the Master of Engineering degree in Systems Engineering from the University of Virginia. She received her Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Engineering from Texas A&M University in 1998, where she concentrated on Industrial Engineering and Management. She holds membership in a number of organizations and serves as Past President and a Fellow of the American Society of Engineering Education, is a member of the National Advisory Board of the National Society of Black Engineers and is a Diamond Life of member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated.

Tanya Ennis named SpectrumX & Research Support Office Broadening Participation Director

Tanya Ennis has assumed a new role as the SpectrumX & Research Support Office Broadening Participation Director, effective March 21. She will be reporting both to Scott Palo, the associate director of SpectrumX, and to the associate dean for research in the College of Engineering & Applied Science, University of Colorado Boulder. 

Read More about Tanya Ennis named SpectrumX & Research Support Office Broadening Participation Director

Tanya Ennis

Tanya Ennis is the SpectrumX & Research Support Office Broadening Participation Director, effective March 21. Previously, she was the director of the GoldShirt Program, which provides underrepresented students access to engineering. Professor Ennis believes that all students, regardless of their circumstances, are learners and have the creative capacity to achieve and exceed their goals, especially to become and thrive as engineers.

As the mathematics department chair at the Denver School of Science and Technology, Professor Ennis’ passion for teaching helped high school students of all backgrounds exceed math performance expectations. She received a BS degree in Electrical Engineering from Southern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana an MS in Computer Engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Ms. Ennis brings a wealth of knowledge from both her professional and educational experience when she advises CU engineering students.

She has extensive corporate experience in the telecommunications industry where she developed and implemented large-scale systems for AT&T, Bell Laboratories, US WEST and Covad Communications.

Martin B. H. Weiss

Martin B. H. Weiss

  • Professor, School of Computing and Information
  • Associate Director, Center for Governance and Markets
Martin B.H. Weiss is Professor in the Department of Informatics and Networked Systems in the School of Computing and Information at the University of Pittsburgh.  He earned his PhD. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.  He earned an MSE in Computer, Control, and Information Engineering from the University of Michigan and a BSE in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University.  His overall research theme is the analysis of situations where competing firms must cooperate technically; this has expressed itself in studying the standardization process, internet interconnection, and, most recently, radio spectrum sharing.
His current research focus is on dynamic spectrum access and intelligent wireless systems.  He is currently studying spectrum sharing and spectrum trading with a focus on understanding the system-level factors supporting and constraining the adoption of these technologies.  Recent aspects of this have involved studying enforcement in cooperative spectrum sharing approaches, secondary users’ constraints and decisions using decision analysis and real options analysis.  Past projects include technical and cost studies new technologies, bandwidth markets, interconnection of packet networks that support quality of service (QoS), and technical standards.

Education & Training

  • Carnegie Mellon University, 1988 PhD Engineering and Public Policy
  • University of Michigan, 1979 MSE Computer, Information, and Control Engineering
  • Northeastern University, 1978 BSE Electrical Engineering