Monisha Ghosh

Areas of Interest

Monisha Ghosh completed a term as the Chief Technology Officer at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on June 14, 2021. In this role she reported to the Chairman of the FCC and was closely involved with setting national strategy and technology specifications related to the explosive growth of broadband wireless communications technologies.

Prof. Ghosh previously served in the NSF as a rotating Program Director (IPA) within the Directorate of Computer & Information Science and Engineering (CISE) where she managed wireless networking research. At the NSF, she initiated one of the first large-scale programs that targets applications of machine learning to wireless networks.

From 2015 to 2021, she also was a Research Professor at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on wireless technologies for the 5G cellular, next-generation Wi-Fi systems, IoT, coexistence and spectrum sharing. She previously worked in industrial research and development at Interdigital, Philips Research, and Bell Laboratories on wireless systems such as the HDTV broadcast standard, cable standardization, and cognitive radio for the TV White Spaces.

She is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Danijela Cabric

Research and Teaching Interests:

Wireless communications system design, machine learning for wireless communications, sensing and security, performance analysis and experiments on embedded platforms and software defined radios

Awards and Recognitions:
2020 Qualcomm Faculty Award
2018-2019 IEEE ComSoc Distinguished Lecturer
2012 NSF Career Award
2012 Hellman Fellow
2009 Okawa Foundation Award
2008 Samueli Fellow

Bert Hochwald

Bertrand Hochwald, Ph.D., serves as the Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical Engineering and Co-Director of the Wireless Institute at the University of Notre Dame. Hochwald has invented and co-invented technologies and published research articles that have become mainstays of communication theory and practice, including differential multiple-antenna methods, linear dispersion codes, channel estimation analysis, and multi-user vector precoding methods.

He is currently working on high-frequency radio circuits, sixth-generation cellular technologies, and methods to reduce human exposure to electromagnetic radiation from cell phones. Hochwald also oversees one of the Wireless Institutes flagship projects, the RadioHound spectrum sensing platform, currently on its third version. This multi-year project is unique in that the sensors have been designed and implemented predominantly by a team of graduate students, and have been deployed in trials run by the Federal Communications Commission and the US Postal Service.

He holds 47 U.S. patents in wireless communication and is the recipient of several achievement awards while employed at the Department of Defense and the Prize Teaching Fellowship at Yale University. He has more than 125 publications, several of which have been listed by Thomson ISI as most-cited over multiple years. Hochwald has also served as an editor for several Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) journals. He has received several paper awards, including the 2018 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society’s Harold A. Wheeler Applications Prize Paper with student Ding Nie. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and the National Academy of Inventors. Thomson Reuters has awarded Hochwald “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds,” multiple times for the significant global impact of his work.

Hochwald believes that wireless communications methods are, after their first 100 years, still in their infancy, and if everyone understood their smartphones a little better, they would all want to design their own.

Bobby Weikle

Robert M. Weikle, II received his B.S. in electrical engineering and physics from Rice University in 1986, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1987 and 1992, respectively. At Caltech, he developed a variety of new techniques for realizing and modeling arrays of coupled nonlinear active devices for microwave/millimeter-wave power combining. For this work, he shared the 1993 IEEE Microwave Prize. During 1992, Dr. Weikle was a postdoctoral research associate with the Department of Applied Electron Physics at Chalmers Tekniska Hogskola in Goteborg, Sweden where he
worked on millimeter-wave amplifiers based on high electron mobility transistors and low-noise terahertz mixers using superconducting hot electron bolometers.

In January 1993, Dr. Weikle joined the faculty of the University of Virginia where he is currently Professor in the Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. During this time, he has built a laboratory for millimeter and submillimeter-wave device characterization, circuit design, prototyping, and metrology and has pursued research on millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave electronics, devices, and systems. Among his groups’ research efforts are design and fabrication techniques for submillimeter-wave integrated circuits, heterogenous integraton of III-V semiconductor devices with micromachined silicon, investigation of measurement instrumentation and calibration techniques for terahertz device and circuit characterization (including micromachined probes for submillimeter-wave on-wafer measurements), and research on planar antennas and quasi-optical components for millimeter-wave imaging and power-combining.

In 2011, Dr. Weikle co-founded Dominion Microprobes, Inc., with colleagues Scott Barker and Arthur Lichtenberger, to develop on-wafer probe technologies for terahertz measurements. He currently serves at its Chief Technology Officer.

Awards

  • IEEE Microwave Prize1993
  • David A. Harrison III Award, University of Virginia1999
  • All-University Teaching Award, University of Virginia 2001
  • Faculty Educational Innovation Award, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia 2015
  • Edlich-Henderson Innovator of the Year Award, University of Virginia 2016

Research Interests

  • Millimeter-Wave and Terahertz Electronics
  • Wireless and Optical Communication Systems

Michael Honig

Research Interests

My research interests are in the areas of communications, signal processing, and networks. My recent work has focused on wireless resource allocation, spectrum markets, and macroeconomic modeling.

Whitney Lohmeyer

Whitney Lohmeyer is an Assistant Professor of Engineering at Olin College and a Research Affiliate at MIT in Aeronautics and Astronautics. She leads the Olin Satellite + Spectrum Technology & Policy (OSSTP) Group, and manages and contributes to the field of satellite communications systems. She also works closely with industry to advise on end-to-end system design, antenna systems, RF power amplification, radiation tolerance and spectrum strategy. Whitney is passionate about enabling affordable Internet access in order to generate economic growth and improve healthcare and education. Whitney was the first engineer hired at OneWeb, a company launching hundreds of low earth orbit communications satellites to provide global broadband and bridge the digital divide. While at OneWeb, she held a variety of roles both technical and policy-focused. As a Systems Engineer, she designed the RF Link Budget, and worked on the end-to-end communications system design, focusing on the LTE waveform and the user terminal antenna. In addition, she actively contributed to policy reform at the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and United Nations (UN) International Telecommunications Union (ITU), and represented OneWeb on the U.S. Delegation to the 2015 World Radio Conference, the culmination of a three-year regulatory review cycle. Prior to joining the OneWeb team, she worked as a hardware engineer at Google, and spent time in technical roles at Inmarsat and NASA. Whitney received her Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT in 2015, and her M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT in 2013, both funded by a National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship. She earned her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from NC State University in 2011, as the only female in her class of approximately ninety students, and now currently serves on the board of North Carolina State University’s Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) Department. She has been invited to speak at a variety of events including NC State’s 2018 MAE Commencement Ceremony, the UN Women’s Gender Equality and Mainstreaming (GEM) The Internet of Women: Challenge or Opportunity? and the UN’s and ITU’s Women’s Leadership Workshop on Empowering Women in Radiocommunications Negotiations.

INTERESTS

  • Satellite Communications
  • Wireless Communications
  • Satellite Systems
  • International Spectrum Policy
  • Principles of Wireless Communications

Tanya Ennis

Tanya Ennis is the SpectrumX & Research Support Office Broadening Participation Director, effective March 21. Previously, she was the director of the GoldShirt Program, which provides underrepresented students access to engineering. Professor Ennis believes that all students, regardless of their circumstances, are learners and have the creative capacity to achieve and exceed their goals, especially to become and thrive as engineers.

As the mathematics department chair at the Denver School of Science and Technology, Professor Ennis’ passion for teaching helped high school students of all backgrounds exceed math performance expectations. She received a BS degree in Electrical Engineering from Southern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana an MS in Computer Engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Ms. Ennis brings a wealth of knowledge from both her professional and educational experience when she advises CU engineering students.

She has extensive corporate experience in the telecommunications industry where she developed and implemented large-scale systems for AT&T, Bell Laboratories, US WEST and Covad Communications.

Martin Weiss

Martin Weiss

  • Professor, School of Computing and Information
  • Associate Director, Center for Governance and Markets
Martin B.H. Weiss is Professor in the Department of Informatics and Networked Systems in the School of Computing and Information at the University of Pittsburgh.  He earned his PhD. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.  He earned an MSE in Computer, Control, and Information Engineering from the University of Michigan and a BSE in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University.  His overall research theme is the analysis of situations where competing firms must cooperate technically; this has expressed itself in studying the standardization process, internet interconnection, and, most recently, radio spectrum sharing.
His current research focus is on dynamic spectrum access and intelligent wireless systems.  He is currently studying spectrum sharing and spectrum trading with a focus on understanding the system-level factors supporting and constraining the adoption of these technologies.  Recent aspects of this have involved studying enforcement in cooperative spectrum sharing approaches, secondary users’ constraints and decisions using decision analysis and real options analysis.  Past projects include technical and cost studies new technologies, bandwidth markets, interconnection of packet networks that support quality of service (QoS), and technical standards.

Education & Training

  • Carnegie Mellon University, 1988 PhD Engineering and Public Policy
  • University of Michigan, 1979 MSE Computer, Information, and Control Engineering
  • Northeastern University, 1978 BSE Electrical Engineering