Rafael A. Rodríguez Solís

Rafael Rodriguez Solis is currently a Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez.

His main interests are wideband and tunable microwave and millimeter-wave antennas and circuits, in particular for communication, radar, and body area network systems. He is the UPRM PI for the NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST), the director of the UPRM Microwave and Millimeter-wave Systems Laboratory and the Institute of Research in Integrative Systems and Engineering (IRISE), and the coordinator for the UPRM Applied Electromagnetics Laboratory.

At this time, Rafael is working on the development of antennas for body-centric wireless communications, in the development of weather nowcast services for renewable energy applications, and in the development of compact microwave sensors for small UAVs. He is a senior member of the IEEE (Antennas and Propagation Society, Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, and Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society).

Ilia Murtazashvili

Interested in American Political development and the challenges of public administration, Murtazashvili focuses his research on the relationship governance and legal titling in the developing world. Using the American frontier as an example, he investigates current challenges developing countries face, and how they can improve their prospects for economic development and political stability.

Teaching and Research Areas

  • Political Economy
  • Property Rights
  • Commons Governance
  • Governance of Technology
  • Public Choice
  • Austrian Economics
  • Institutional Economics

Thomas Marzetta

Thomas Marzetta is Distinguished Industry Professor at NYU Tandon School of Engineering’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Director of NYU WIRELESS. Born in Washington, D.C., he received the Ph.D. and SB in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1978 and 1972, and the MS in Systems Engineering from University of Pennsylvania in 1973. Prior to joining NYU in 2017, he had three industrial research careers: petroleum exploration (Schlumberger-Doll Research, 1978 – 1987), defense (Nichols Research Corporation, 1987 – 1995), and telecommunications (Bell Labs, 1995 – 2017). At Bell Labs, he directed the Communications and Statistical Sciences Department within the former Mathematical Sciences Research Center, and he was elected a Bell Labs Fellow. He originated Massive MIMO, one of the cornerstones of fifth-generation wireless technology. He is lead author of the book Fundamentals of Massive MIMO.

Professor Marzetta was on the Advisory Board of MAMMOET (Massive MIMO for Efficient Transmission), an EU-sponsored FP7 project, and he was Coordinator of the GreenTouch Consortium’s Large Scale Antenna Systems Project. Recognition for his contributions to Massive MIMO include the 2017 IEEE Communications Society Industrial Innovation Award, the 2015 IEEE Stephen O. Rice Prize, and the 2015 IEEE W. R. G. Baker Award. He was elected a Fellow of the IEEE in 2003, and he received an Honorary Doctorate from Linköping University in 2015.

Research Interests: Massive MIMO (Multiple-Input Multiple-Output), Wireless technology

Education:

University of Pennsylvania, 1973
Master of Science, Systems Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1978
Doctor of Philosophy, Electrical Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1972
Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering

Thomas Hazlett

Thomas Hazlett holds the H.H. Macaulay Endowed Chair in Economics at Clemson, conducting research in the field of Law and Economics and specializing in the Information Economy, including the analysis of markets and regulation in telecommunications, media, and the Internet. Prof. Hazlett served as Chief Economist of the Federal Communications Commission, and has held faculty positions at the University of California, Davis, Columbia University, the Wharton School, and George Mason University School of Law. His research has appeared in such academic publications as the Journal of Law & Economics, the Journal of Legal Studies, the Journal of Financial Economics and the Rand Journal of Economics, and he has published articles in the Univ. of Pennsylvania Law Review, the Yale Journal on Regulation, the Columbia Law Review, and the Berkeley Technology Law Journal. He also writes for popular periodicals including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Reason, The New Republic, The Economist, Slate, and the Financial Times, where he was a columnist on technology policy issues, 2002-2011. Prof. Hazlett also serves as Director of the Information Economy Project at Clemson University. He has provided expert testimony to federal and state courts, regulatory agencies, committees of Congress, foreign governments, and international organizations. His latest book, THE POLITICAL SPECTRUM: The Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology, from Herbert Hoover to the Smartphone, was published by Yale University Press in 2017.

Steven M. Bowers

Steven M. Bowers received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA, in 2007, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in millimeter- wave circuits and systems from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA, in 2009 and 2014, respectively. In August 2014, he joined the faculty of the Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, where he is currently an Associate Professor. His research interests include holistic integration of high-frequency analog circuits, advanced digital circuits, novel electromag- netic structures and integrated silicon photonics to enable the next generation of millimeter-wave applications, specifically in adaptive and self-healing millimeter-wave circuits and millimeter-wave power generation, radiation, and detection.

Dr. Bowers is a member of IEEE HKN and TBP. He was the recipient of the California Institute of Technology’s Institute Fellowship (2007), the Analog Devices Outstanding Student Designer Award (2009), the IEEE RFIC Symposium Best Student Paper Award (2012), the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (IEEE MTT-S) International Microwave Symposium (IMS) Best Student Paper Award (2013), and the 2015 IEEE MTT-S Microwave Prize.

Education:

B.S. ​University of California, San Diego, 2007

M.S. California Institute of Technology, 2009​

Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, 2014

Post-Doc California Institute of Technology, 2013-2014​

Awards:

  • IEEE MTT-S Microwave Prize, 2015
  • IEEE International Microwave Symposium Best Student Paper Award, 2013
  • IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits Conference Best Student Paper Award, 2012

Research Interests:

  • Internet of Things
  • Millimeter-Wave and Terahertz Electronics
  • Low Power Design

Cong Shen

Cong Shen received his B.S. and M.S. degrees, in 2002 and 2004 respectively, from the Department of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, China. He obtained the Ph.D. degree from the Electrical Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), in 2009. Prior to joining the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at University of Virginia, Dr. Shen was a professor in the School of Information Science and Technology at University of Science and Technology of China (USTC). He also has extensive industry experience, having worked for Qualcomm Research, SpiderCloud Wireless, Silvus Technologies, and Xsense.ai, in various full time and consulting roles. His general research interests are in the area of communication theory, wireless communications, and machine learning.

He was the recipient of the “Excellent Paper Award” in the 9th International Conference on Ubiquitous and Future Networks (ICUFN 2017). Currently, he serves as an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and editor for the IEEE Wireless Communications Letters.

Education: 

B.S. Tsinghua University, China, 2002

M.S. Tsinghua University, China, 2004

Ph.D. University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), 2009

Awards:

  • Excellent Paper Award, the 9th International Conference on Ubiquitous and Future Networks (ICUFN) 2017
  • IEEE Senior Member, since 2014

Research Interests:

  • Wireless communications and networking
  • Machine learning at the wireless edge
  • Multi-armed bandits and reinforcement learning

Gerhard Schoenthal

Gerhard received his BS in Physics from the US Naval Academy in 1992 and his Ph D. in Physics from the University of Virginia in 2003. After graduating from the Naval Academy, Gerhard served on active duty in the US Navy for 5 years. After graduate school, he worked as a Senior Process Engineer at Intel PTD in 2003 and 2004. For the past 16 years, he has served in many roles at Virginia Diodes, Inc. the world’s leading mmWave and THz test and measurement and components company. He is currently the Chief Operations Officer.

Anant Sahai

Biography

Anant Sahai did his undergraduate work in EECS at UC Berkeley, and then went to MIT as a graduate student studying Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6 in MIT-speak). After graduating with his PhD, and before joining the Berkeley faculty, he was on the theoretical/algorithmic side of a team at the startup Enuvis, Inc. developing new adaptive software radio techniques for GPS in very low SNR environments (such as those encountered indoors in urban areas).He currently serves also as faculty adviser to UC Berkeley’s chapter of Eta Kappa Nu. He has previously served as the Treasurer for the IEEE Information Theory Society.

His research interests span information theory, decentralized control, machine learning, and wireless communication — with a particular interest at the intersections of these fields. Within wireless communication, he is particularly interested in Spectrum Sharing and Cognitive Radio, very-low-latency ultra-reliable wireless communication protocols for the Internet Of Things, and how agents could learn how to communicate with each other without the need for heavy-handed standards. Within control, he is interested in decentralized control and how agents could learn how to cooperate and interact with unknown environments. He is also interested in the foundations of machine learning, particularly as it pertains to why overparameterized models do or do not work.

Education

  • 2001, PhD, EECS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • 1996, SM, EECS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • 1994, BS, EECS, University of California, Berkeley

Research Areas

Pierre de Vries

Pierre de Vries is former co-director of the Spectrum Policy Initiative and current director emeritus and distinguished advisor at Silicon Flatirons. He has worked in seed venture capital, technology consulting, software development and spectrum policy, and is currently exploring how people use socially significant stories to make sense of technology. He is also currently scholar in residence at the ATLAS Institute of the University of Colorado Boulder, and visiting senior scientist at the Institute for Networked Systems of RWTH Aachen University. He was a technology advisor to Harris Wiltshire & Grannis LLP, Washington DC (2007–2010) and senior fellow at the Annenberg Center for Communication of the University of Southern California (2006–2007). Prior to this, he held various positions at Microsoft including chief of incubation and senior director of advanced technology and policy. De Vries holds a BSc (Honours) from Stellenbosch University and a DPhil in theoretical physics from the University of Oxford.