LEO Satellite Constellations: Why Smart Sharing Rules Matter in Space

Learn more and register: here

From hosting organization New America:

Please join FCC Commissioners Geoffrey Starks and Nathan Simington, as well as a panel that includes representatives of the two U.S. industry leaders (Amazon’s Project Kuiper and SpaceX’s Starlink) and noted policy experts, to discuss the key regulatory debates that will shape the industry’s future.

Keynote Remarks:

Commissioner Geoffrey Starks
Federal Communications Commission

Commissioner Nathan Simington
Federal Communications Commission

Discussion Panel:

Julie Zoller
Head of Global Regulatory Affairs, Amazon’s Project Kuiper

David Goldman
Senior Director of Satellite Policy, SpaceX

Whitney Lohmeyer
Assistant Professor of Engineering, Olin College of Engineering

Harold Feld
Senior Vice President, Public Knowledge

William Webb

William is CTO at Access Partnership. He was one of the founding directors of Neul, a company developing machine-to-machine technologies and networks, which was formed at the start of 2011 and became CEO of the Weightless SIG, a body standardizing IoT technology. Prior to this William was a Director at Ofcom where he managed a team providing technical advice and performing research. He has worked for a range of communications consultancies and spent three years providing strategic management across Motorola’s entire communications portfolio, based in Chicago. He was IET President 2014-2015.

William has published 17 books, 100 papers, and 18 patents. He is a Visiting Professor at Southampton University, a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the IEEE and the IET. He has been awarded multiple honorary doctorates by the UK’s leading universities and in 2018 was awarded the IET’s prestigious Mountbatten Medal for technology entrepreneurship.

Rafael A. Rodríguez Solís

Rafael Rodriguez Solis is currently a Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez.

His main interests are wideband and tunable microwave and millimeter-wave antennas and circuits, in particular for communication, radar, and body area network systems. He is the UPRM PI for the NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST), the director of the UPRM Microwave and Millimeter-wave Systems Laboratory and the Institute of Research in Integrative Systems and Engineering (IRISE), and the coordinator for the UPRM Applied Electromagnetics Laboratory.

At this time, Rafael is working on the development of antennas for body-centric wireless communications, in the development of weather nowcast services for renewable energy applications, and in the development of compact microwave sensors for small UAVs. He is a senior member of the IEEE (Antennas and Propagation Society, Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, and Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society).

Radio Shop Chat / 6G and the Exploration of New and Additional Spectrum above 100GHz

We want to thank Roger Nichols, 6G Program Manager for Keysight Technologies, Inc. for presenting 6G and the Exploration of New and Additional Spectrum above 100GHz as part of the Radio Shop Chat Series. His presentation provided an overview of how Keysight sees the move to 6G impacting the demand for spectrum from 100 to 400 GHz. In addition, he highlighted the measurement challenges we face for materials, radio channels, components, and systems, including interoperability and co-existence.

Read More about Radio Shop Chat / 6G and the Exploration of New and Additional Spectrum above 100GHz

Danijela Cabric

Research and Teaching Interests:

Wireless communications system design, machine learning for wireless communications, sensing and security, performance analysis and experiments on embedded platforms and software defined radios

Awards and Recognitions:
2020 Qualcomm Faculty Award
2018-2019 IEEE ComSoc Distinguished Lecturer
2012 NSF Career Award
2012 Hellman Fellow
2009 Okawa Foundation Award
2008 Samueli Fellow

Bert Hochwald

Bertrand Hochwald, Ph.D., serves as the Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical Engineering and Co-Director of the Wireless Institute at the University of Notre Dame. Hochwald has invented and co-invented technologies and published research articles that have become mainstays of communication theory and practice, including differential multiple-antenna methods, linear dispersion codes, channel estimation analysis, and multi-user vector precoding methods.

He is currently working on high-frequency radio circuits, sixth-generation cellular technologies, and methods to reduce human exposure to electromagnetic radiation from cell phones. Hochwald also oversees one of the Wireless Institutes flagship projects, the RadioHound spectrum sensing platform, currently on its third version. This multi-year project is unique in that the sensors have been designed and implemented predominantly by a team of graduate students, and have been deployed in trials run by the Federal Communications Commission and the US Postal Service.

He holds 47 U.S. patents in wireless communication and is the recipient of several achievement awards while employed at the Department of Defense and the Prize Teaching Fellowship at Yale University. He has more than 125 publications, several of which have been listed by Thomson ISI as most-cited over multiple years. Hochwald has also served as an editor for several Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) journals. He has received several paper awards, including the 2018 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society’s Harold A. Wheeler Applications Prize Paper with student Ding Nie. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and the National Academy of Inventors. Thomson Reuters has awarded Hochwald “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds,” multiple times for the significant global impact of his work.

Hochwald believes that wireless communications methods are, after their first 100 years, still in their infancy, and if everyone understood their smartphones a little better, they would all want to design their own.

Bobby Weikle

Robert M. Weikle, II received his B.S. in electrical engineering and physics from Rice University in 1986, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1987 and 1992, respectively. At Caltech, he developed a variety of new techniques for realizing and modeling arrays of coupled nonlinear active devices for microwave/millimeter-wave power combining. For this work, he shared the 1993 IEEE Microwave Prize. During 1992, Dr. Weikle was a postdoctoral research associate with the Department of Applied Electron Physics at Chalmers Tekniska Hogskola in Goteborg, Sweden where he
worked on millimeter-wave amplifiers based on high electron mobility transistors and low-noise terahertz mixers using superconducting hot electron bolometers.

In January 1993, Dr. Weikle joined the faculty of the University of Virginia where he is currently Professor in the Charles L. Brown Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. During this time, he has built a laboratory for millimeter and submillimeter-wave device characterization, circuit design, prototyping, and metrology and has pursued research on millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave electronics, devices, and systems. Among his groups’ research efforts are design and fabrication techniques for submillimeter-wave integrated circuits, heterogenous integraton of III-V semiconductor devices with micromachined silicon, investigation of measurement instrumentation and calibration techniques for terahertz device and circuit characterization (including micromachined probes for submillimeter-wave on-wafer measurements), and research on planar antennas and quasi-optical components for millimeter-wave imaging and power-combining.

In 2011, Dr. Weikle co-founded Dominion Microprobes, Inc., with colleagues Scott Barker and Arthur Lichtenberger, to develop on-wafer probe technologies for terahertz measurements. He currently serves at its Chief Technology Officer.

Awards

  • IEEE Microwave Prize1993
  • David A. Harrison III Award, University of Virginia1999
  • All-University Teaching Award, University of Virginia 2001
  • Faculty Educational Innovation Award, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia 2015
  • Edlich-Henderson Innovator of the Year Award, University of Virginia 2016

Research Interests

  • Millimeter-Wave and Terahertz Electronics
  • Wireless and Optical Communication Systems

Michael Honig

Research Interests

My research interests are in the areas of communications, signal processing, and networks. My recent work has focused on wireless resource allocation, spectrum markets, and macroeconomic modeling.