October SpectrumX Center Meeting a Success

The SpectrumX Center Meeting on October 3 and 4, held at the University of Virginia (UVA), brought together over 65 learners and leaders for cross-cutting discussions on timely and interdisciplinary topics.

“The meeting provided an opportunity for students, researchers, stakeholders, and professionals in policy making to come together at UVA to discuss some of the most important subjects in our field,” said Bobby Weikle, SpectrumX Steering Committee Chair and Radio and Network Technologies Research Lead, and Professor at the University of Virginia. “UVA has a long history of collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and it was a great opportunity to bring their teams and our center together in-person and online.”

LEO Satellite Constellations: Why Smart Sharing Rules Matter in Space

Learn more and register: here

From hosting organization New America:

Please join FCC Commissioners Geoffrey Starks and Nathan Simington, as well as a panel that includes representatives of the two U.S. industry leaders (Amazon’s Project Kuiper and SpaceX’s Starlink) and noted policy experts, to discuss the key regulatory debates that will shape the industry’s future.

Keynote Remarks:

Commissioner Geoffrey Starks
Federal Communications Commission

Commissioner Nathan Simington
Federal Communications Commission

Discussion Panel:

Julie Zoller
Head of Global Regulatory Affairs, Amazon’s Project Kuiper

David Goldman
Senior Director of Satellite Policy, SpaceX

Whitney Lohmeyer
Assistant Professor of Engineering, Olin College of Engineering

Harold Feld
Senior Vice President, Public Knowledge

Spectrum Sovereignty on Tribal Lands: Assessing the DIGITAL Reservations Act

Published on SSRN, August 3, 2022
Authored by: Darrah Blackwater (Independent), Ilia Murtazashvili (University of Pittsburgh – Graduate School of Public and International Affairs), and Martin B.H. Weiss (University of PIttsburgh – School of Computing and Information)

Abstract: The Federal Communications Commission currently has unlimited authority over governance of electromagnetic spectrum on sovereign tribal lands in the United States. This monocentric system, with spectrum governed exclusively by the FCC, essentially eliminates opportunities for tribal governments to develop innovative ways to manage spectrum to close the digital divide on Tribal lands, to choose how much of spectrum is available for commercial, public, or community use, and eliminates ability of tribes to fully control revenue from spectrum on tribal lands. The Deploying the Internet by Guaranteeing Indian Tribes Autonomy over Licensing (DIGITAL) Reservations Act envisions a new path for spectrum governance which affirms self-management and self-governance of spectrum on tribal lands. In this paper, we consider the extent to which the DIGITAL Reservations Act contrasts with current spectrum governance in the United States. We argue that the DIGITAL Reservations Act envisions a polycentric system of spectrum governance and that it is a workable system of spectrum governance that acknowledges tribal sovereignty over one of its most valuable assets.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4178671

Mitigating conflict situations in spectrum sharing: A localized and decentralized governance approach

Published on SSRN, August 15, 2022
Authored by: Pedro Bustamante, University of Pittsburgh – School of Information Sciences, Students; Carnegie Mellon University

Abstract: As spectrum sharing matures, usage conflict situations (e.g., harmful interference) remain a common concern. To deal with the challenges associated with conflict situations, multiple solutions have been proposed. Examples of approaches to mitigate conflict situations include the creation of exclusion and coordination zones, the development of spectrum coordinators (e.g., SAS), or the implementation of sensing-based mechanisms. Nonetheless, most of these solutions are designed as “one-size-fits-all” or global solutions. In this paper, we propose a local analysis of conflict situations in spectrum sharing settings through the design, development, and deployment of polycentric and self-governance systems. We have created a multi-tiered spectrum sharing model to analyze such systems using Agent-Based Modeling, Common-Pool Resource frameworks, and the core definitions of Radio Environment Maps (REMs).

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4189545

SpectrumX hosting Fall 2022 center meeting at the University of Virginia

 SpectrumX, a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) Spectrum Innovation Center, will host its next semi-annual center meeting on October 3 and 4, 2022. The event will bring together the center’s members and partners, including faculty and student researchers, industry collaborators, and government agency representatives, in a hybrid meeting format with in-person attendees enjoying the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville. The center launched in September 2021 with a $25 million grant from the NSF Spectrum Innovation Initiative, and its members have been working hard to execute on plans and realize its vision as the world’s largest academic hub in the radio spectrum ecosystem.

SpectrumX Postdoc, Pedro Bustamante, wins student competition at TPRC 2022

On Saturday, September 17, 2022, Pedro Bustamante, former SpectrumX member and postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Governance and Markets at the University of Pittsburgh, and current Assistant Teaching Professor at the Information and Networking Institute at Carnegie Mellon University was awarded the first prize of the student paper competition at the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference (TPRC) 2022.

Stephanie Adams

Dr. Stephanie G. Adams is the 5th Dean of the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Texas, Dallas. Previously Dr. Adams served as the Dean of the Frank Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University (2016–2019), Department Head and Professor of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech (2011–2016) and held faculty and administrative positions at Virginia Commonwealth University (2008–2011) and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1998–2008).

Her research interests include: Broadening Participation, Faculty and Graduate Student Development, International/Global Education, Teamwork and Team Effectiveness, and Quality Control and Management.  In 2003, she received the CAREER award from the Engineering Education and Centers Division of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Adams is a leader in the advancement and inclusion of all in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.  She has worked with a number of colleges and universities, government agencies and non-profit organizations on topics related to graduate education, mentoring, faculty development and diversifying STEM. A few examples include: The University of Michigan, North Carolina State University, NASA Must Program, QEM Network and the Gates Millennium Scholars Program.

Dr. Adams is a leader in the advancement and inclusion of all in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.  She has had the privilege of serving on the Board of Directors for a number of STEM organizations including the American Society of Engineering Education, the National Society of Black Engineers, Women in Engineering ProActive Network, and the National GEM Consortium. She has also worked with the National Academy of Engineering, the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Institute of Industrial Engineers, the Quality Education for Minorities Network, and the Council of Graduate Schools to build supportive educational coalitions and partnerships in advancing the engineering profession and educational community.

Dr. Adams is the recipient of numerous awards, including: the 2017 WEPAN Founder’s Award; the 2016 ASEE Engineering Management Division Bernard R. Sarchet Award; the 2013 North Carolina A&T State University Distinguished Alumni Award; the 2008 DuPont Minorities in Engineering Award from the American Society of Engineering Education; the Holling Teaching/Advising/Mentoring Award, the Henry Y. Kleinkauf Outstanding Assistant Professor Teaching Award, the Assistant Professor Service Award and the Chancellor’s Fulfilling the Dream Award from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; and the Janice A. Lumpkin Educator of the Year from the National Society of Black Engineers.  In 2005, she was selected as an AAAS/NSF Science and Engineering Policy Fellow and in 2006 she was an Invited Participant for the U.S. Frontiers in Engineering Symposium hosted by the National Academy of Engineering.

Dr. Adams is an honor graduate of North Carolina A&T State University, where she earned her BS in Mechanical Engineering, in 1988. In 1991, she was awarded the Master of Engineering degree in Systems Engineering from the University of Virginia. She received her Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Engineering from Texas A&M University in 1998, where she concentrated on Industrial Engineering and Management. She holds membership in a number of organizations and serves as Past President and a Fellow of the American Society of Engineering Education, is a member of the National Advisory Board of the National Society of Black Engineers and is a Diamond Life of member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated.