October SpectrumX Center Meeting a Success

The SpectrumX Center Meeting on October 3 and 4, held at the University of Virginia (UVA), brought together over 65 learners and leaders for cross-cutting discussions on timely and interdisciplinary topics.

“The meeting provided an opportunity for students, researchers, stakeholders, and professionals in policy making to come together at UVA to discuss some of the most important subjects in our field,” said Bobby Weikle, SpectrumX Steering Committee Chair and Radio and Network Technologies Research Lead, and Professor at the University of Virginia. “UVA has a long history of collaboration with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and it was a great opportunity to bring their teams and our center together in-person and online.”

Charla Rath

Charla Rath is current co-chair of the Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory

Committee (CSMAC) and former Verizon Vice President – Wireless Policy Development. At Verizon, Charla was responsible for developing and managing the company’s public policy initiatives related to spectrum management, particularly focusing on alternative spectrum auction mechanisms and sources of spectrum for next generation wireless networks, including 5G. Previously at Verizon Wireless, alongside the company’s business development and network planning groups, Charla identified and addressed the key policy and regulatory issues that enabled Verizon Wireless to secure a nationwide spectrum footprint.

Prior to joining Verizon Wireless, Charla was Vice President – Strategic Affiliations, of NextWave Telecom Inc. and Vice President of Freedom Technologies, Inc., a Washington, DC-based telecommunications consulting firm.

Charla also served as advisor to FCC Chairman Alfred C. Sikes on common carrier and spectrum policy issues and as a primary specialist in spectrum and internet policy at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.

Charla has an MA in science, technology, and public policy from The George Washington University and a BSFS (Foreign Service) in international economics and finance from Georgetown University.

Julius Knapp

Julius Knapp retired from the Federal Communications Commission on January 3, 2020 after 45+ years of service.  From 2006 till his retirement he served as the Chief of the FCC’s Office of Engineering and Technology (OET).  OET is the Commission’s primary resource for engineering expertise and provides technical support to the Chairman, Commissioners and FCC Bureaus and Offices.

Mr. Knapp previously served as a Deputy Chief of OET from 2002 – 2006. Prior to that he was the Chief of the Policy & Rules Division where he was responsible for FCC frequency allocation proceedings and for proceedings amending the FCC rules for unlicensed radio frequency devices. Mr. Knapp was Chief of the FCC Laboratory from 1994 – 1997 where he was responsible for the FCC’s equipment authorization program and technical analyses.

He received the FCC’s Silver and Gold Medal Awards for distinguished service at the Commission as well as the Presidential Distinguished Rank Award for exceptional achievement in the career Senior Executive Service. Mr. Knapp has been the recipient of the Eugene C. Bowler award for exceptional professionalism and dedication to public service; the Federal Communications Bar Association Excellence in Government Service Award; the WCAI Government Leadership award; the National Spectrum Management Association Fellow Award; the Dynamic Spectrum Alliance Lifetime Achievement Award; Wi-Fi Alliance recognition for commitment to Wi-Fi and unlicensed spectrum; the Association of Federal Communications Consulting Engineers E. Noel Luddy Award; and the Satellite Industry Association Satellite Leadership in Government Award. Mr. Knapp is a Life Member of the IEEE. He received a Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the City College of New York in 1974.

Ruth Milkman

Ruth Milkman is a partner in Quadra Partners, LLC, a strategic-advisory firm providing integrated expertise across business, finance, and public policy in the context of converging communications technologies.  Ms. Milkman served as the Chief of Staff of the Federal Communications Commission from 2013-2017 and Chief of the FCC’s Wireless Telecommunications Bureau between 2009 and 2013. From 1998-2009 she worked as one of the leading telecommunications lawyers in Washington as co-founder of Lawler, Metzger, Milkman and Keeney, a firm serving clients ranging from start-ups to large established telecommunications companies and private-equity firms.  Before joining Lawler, Metzger, Ms. Milkman held a variety of senior positions at the FCC, including Senior Legal Advisor to Chairman Reed Hundt and Deputy Chief of the International and Common Carrier Bureaus.

Ms. Milkman has a B.A. from Harvard University and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School.  She served as a clerk for the Honorable J. Harvie Wilkinson III on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

Monisha Ghosh

Areas of Interest

Monisha Ghosh completed a term as the Chief Technology Officer at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on June 14, 2021. In this role she reported to the Chairman of the FCC and was closely involved with setting national strategy and technology specifications related to the explosive growth of broadband wireless communications technologies.

Prof. Ghosh previously served in the NSF as a rotating Program Director (IPA) within the Directorate of Computer & Information Science and Engineering (CISE) where she managed wireless networking research. At the NSF, she initiated one of the first large-scale programs that targets applications of machine learning to wireless networks.

From 2015 to 2021, she also was a Research Professor at the University of Chicago, where she conducted research on wireless technologies for the 5G cellular, next-generation Wi-Fi systems, IoT, coexistence and spectrum sharing. She previously worked in industrial research and development at Interdigital, Philips Research, and Bell Laboratories on wireless systems such as the HDTV broadcast standard, cable standardization, and cognitive radio for the TV White Spaces.

She is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Ilia Murtazashvili

Interested in American Political development and the challenges of public administration, Murtazashvili focuses his research on the relationship governance and legal titling in the developing world. Using the American frontier as an example, he investigates current challenges developing countries face, and how they can improve their prospects for economic development and political stability.

Teaching and Research Areas

  • Political Economy
  • Property Rights
  • Commons Governance
  • Governance of Technology
  • Public Choice
  • Austrian Economics
  • Institutional Economics

Martin B. H. Weiss

Martin B. H. Weiss

  • Professor, School of Computing and Information
  • Associate Director, Center for Governance and Markets
Martin B.H. Weiss is Professor in the Department of Informatics and Networked Systems in the School of Computing and Information at the University of Pittsburgh.  He earned his PhD. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.  He earned an MSE in Computer, Control, and Information Engineering from the University of Michigan and a BSE in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University.  His overall research theme is the analysis of situations where competing firms must cooperate technically; this has expressed itself in studying the standardization process, internet interconnection, and, most recently, radio spectrum sharing.
His current research focus is on dynamic spectrum access and intelligent wireless systems.  He is currently studying spectrum sharing and spectrum trading with a focus on understanding the system-level factors supporting and constraining the adoption of these technologies.  Recent aspects of this have involved studying enforcement in cooperative spectrum sharing approaches, secondary users’ constraints and decisions using decision analysis and real options analysis.  Past projects include technical and cost studies new technologies, bandwidth markets, interconnection of packet networks that support quality of service (QoS), and technical standards.

Education & Training

  • Carnegie Mellon University, 1988 PhD Engineering and Public Policy
  • University of Michigan, 1979 MSE Computer, Information, and Control Engineering
  • Northeastern University, 1978 BSE Electrical Engineering

Thomas Hazlett

Thomas Hazlett holds the H.H. Macaulay Endowed Chair in Economics at Clemson, conducting research in the field of Law and Economics and specializing in the Information Economy, including the analysis of markets and regulation in telecommunications, media, and the Internet. Prof. Hazlett served as Chief Economist of the Federal Communications Commission, and has held faculty positions at the University of California, Davis, Columbia University, the Wharton School, and George Mason University School of Law. His research has appeared in such academic publications as the Journal of Law & Economics, the Journal of Legal Studies, the Journal of Financial Economics and the Rand Journal of Economics, and he has published articles in the Univ. of Pennsylvania Law Review, the Yale Journal on Regulation, the Columbia Law Review, and the Berkeley Technology Law Journal. He also writes for popular periodicals including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Reason, The New Republic, The Economist, Slate, and the Financial Times, where he was a columnist on technology policy issues, 2002-2011. Prof. Hazlett also serves as Director of the Information Economy Project at Clemson University. He has provided expert testimony to federal and state courts, regulatory agencies, committees of Congress, foreign governments, and international organizations. His latest book, THE POLITICAL SPECTRUM: The Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology, from Herbert Hoover to the Smartphone, was published by Yale University Press in 2017.

Pierre de Vries

Pierre de Vries is former co-director of the Spectrum Policy Initiative and current director emeritus and distinguished advisor at Silicon Flatirons. He has worked in seed venture capital, technology consulting, software development and spectrum policy, and is currently exploring how people use socially significant stories to make sense of technology. He is also currently scholar in residence at the ATLAS Institute of the University of Colorado Boulder, and visiting senior scientist at the Institute for Networked Systems of RWTH Aachen University. He was a technology advisor to Harris Wiltshire & Grannis LLP, Washington DC (2007–2010) and senior fellow at the Annenberg Center for Communication of the University of Southern California (2006–2007). Prior to this, he held various positions at Microsoft including chief of incubation and senior director of advanced technology and policy. De Vries holds a BSc (Honours) from Stellenbosch University and a DPhil in theoretical physics from the University of Oxford.

Dale Hatfield

Bio:

Dale N. Hatfield is currently an Executive Fellow at the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship and an Adjunct Professor in the Interdisciplinary Telecommunications Program – both at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Prior to joining the University of Colorado, Hatfield was the Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and, immediately before that, he was Chief Technologist at the Agency. He retired from the FCC and government service in December 2000.

Before joining the FCC in December 1997, he was Chief Executive Officer of Hatfield Associates, Inc., a Boulder, Colorado based multidisciplinary telecommunications consulting firm. Before founding the consulting firm in 1982, Hatfield was Acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information and Acting Administrator of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). Before moving to NTIA, Hatfield was Chief of the Office of Plans and Policy at the FCC.

Hatfield has over fifty years of experience in telecommunications policy and regulation, spectrum management and related areas. He holds a BS in electrical engineering from Case Institute of Technology and an MS in Industrial Management from Purdue University. In May 2008, Hatfield was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science degree by the University of Colorado for, inter alia, his commitment to the development of interdisciplinary telecommunications studies.

Hatfield was the founding Executive Director of the Broadband Internet Technical Advisory Group (BITAG). He is currently serving on the FCC’s Technology Advisory Council (TAC) and on the Commerce Department’s Spectrum Management Advisory Committee (CSMAC) and served as an independent Director of Crown Castle International Corp. from July 2001 until his retirement in May 2017.