Thomas Hazlett

Thomas Hazlett holds the H.H. Macaulay Endowed Chair in Economics at Clemson, conducting research in the field of Law and Economics and specializing in the Information Economy, including the analysis of markets and regulation in telecommunications, media, and the Internet. Prof. Hazlett served as Chief Economist of the Federal Communications Commission, and has held faculty positions at the University of California, Davis, Columbia University, the Wharton School, and George Mason University School of Law. His research has appeared in such academic publications as the Journal of Law & Economics, the Journal of Legal Studies, the Journal of Financial Economics and the Rand Journal of Economics, and he has published articles in the Univ. of Pennsylvania Law Review, the Yale Journal on Regulation, the Columbia Law Review, and the Berkeley Technology Law Journal. He also writes for popular periodicals including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Reason, The New Republic, The Economist, Slate, and the Financial Times, where he was a columnist on technology policy issues, 2002-2011. Prof. Hazlett also serves as Director of the Information Economy Project at Clemson University. He has provided expert testimony to federal and state courts, regulatory agencies, committees of Congress, foreign governments, and international organizations. His latest book, THE POLITICAL SPECTRUM: The Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology, from Herbert Hoover to the Smartphone, was published by Yale University Press in 2017.

Pierre de Vries

Pierre de Vries is former co-director of the Spectrum Policy Initiative and current director emeritus and distinguished advisor at Silicon Flatirons. He has worked in seed venture capital, technology consulting, software development and spectrum policy, and is currently exploring how people use socially significant stories to make sense of technology. He is also currently scholar in residence at the ATLAS Institute of the University of Colorado Boulder, and visiting senior scientist at the Institute for Networked Systems of RWTH Aachen University. He was a technology advisor to Harris Wiltshire & Grannis LLP, Washington DC (2007–2010) and senior fellow at the Annenberg Center for Communication of the University of Southern California (2006–2007). Prior to this, he held various positions at Microsoft including chief of incubation and senior director of advanced technology and policy. De Vries holds a BSc (Honours) from Stellenbosch University and a DPhil in theoretical physics from the University of Oxford.

Dale Hatfield

Bio:

Dale N. Hatfield is currently an Executive Fellow at the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship and an Adjunct Professor in the Interdisciplinary Telecommunications Program – both at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Prior to joining the University of Colorado, Hatfield was the Chief of the Office of Engineering and Technology at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and, immediately before that, he was Chief Technologist at the Agency. He retired from the FCC and government service in December 2000.

Before joining the FCC in December 1997, he was Chief Executive Officer of Hatfield Associates, Inc., a Boulder, Colorado based multidisciplinary telecommunications consulting firm. Before founding the consulting firm in 1982, Hatfield was Acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information and Acting Administrator of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). Before moving to NTIA, Hatfield was Chief of the Office of Plans and Policy at the FCC.

Hatfield has over fifty years of experience in telecommunications policy and regulation, spectrum management and related areas. He holds a BS in electrical engineering from Case Institute of Technology and an MS in Industrial Management from Purdue University. In May 2008, Hatfield was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science degree by the University of Colorado for, inter alia, his commitment to the development of interdisciplinary telecommunications studies.

Hatfield was the founding Executive Director of the Broadband Internet Technical Advisory Group (BITAG). He is currently serving on the FCC’s Technology Advisory Council (TAC) and on the Commerce Department’s Spectrum Management Advisory Committee (CSMAC) and served as an independent Director of Crown Castle International Corp. from July 2001 until his retirement in May 2017.

Randall Berry

Education

Ph.D. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, MA

S.M. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, MA

B.S. Electrical Engineering, University of Missouri, Rolla, MO

 

Research Interests

Prof. Berry’s research covers resource allocation problems that arise in networked systems ranging from communication networks to social networks. This work uses mathematical models to gain insights into such systems and draws on tools from stochastic modeling, optimization, economics and algorithms. Specific topics of current interest include developing distributed resource allocation techniques for wireless networks, dynamic spectrum sharing and wireless spectrum policy, understanding the role of incentives in network security and modeling learning and adoption in social networks.